Monday, June 1, 2009

Poached Green Eggs & Smoked Salmon

I used to have a list of ‘forbidden foods’, foods I couldn’t eat due to my misconception that they were high in fat and/or high in calories. Although they were nutritious and good for me, I believed they would make me fat. As I overcame this deceptive perception, I began to eat and thoroughly enjoy those forbidden foods, one being the delectable egg. Around the same time I began eating eggs, I began eating organic, which is how I stumbled upon a local farm that produces organic eggs from cage free hens, Windsor Dairy, located in Windsor Colorado. I was first introduced to Windsor Dairy at the Boulder Farmer’s Market where Meg & Arden, founders of Windsor Dairy, are our there weekly educating consumers about why they produce grassfed, organic products. Their cage free organic eggs are a little more expensive then conventional, $5/dozen, but there is no comparison with what you get in return. They are better tasting, nutritious, socially responsible, sustainable and local. Understanding the measures taken in producing better eggs has helped me feel better about what I cook and eat. Check out your local farmer’s market to see what they have to offer…and if you find eggs, try this recipe for BBLD (breakfast, brunch, lunch dinner)…




Poaching eggs is a great way to get all their nutrients while keeping the yolk intact thereby creating rich a flavorful ‘eggcelent sauce’ without adding any extra ingredients or calories. 

Poached Green Eggs & Smoked Salmon

Ingredients

  • 2 heaping BOULDER BLUES Green tea (or any other fruity green tea)
  • 1 TBS white vinegar
  • 4 eggs; preferably grassfed, organic, local 
  • 4 slices whole wheat or multi-grain bread, slightly toasted
  • 2 avocados, mashed
  • 1 medium tomato, sliced
  • 6-8 oz smoked salmon
  • 2 cups watercress
  • 1 cup red onion, diced
  • 4 TBS capers, drained
  • ¼ cup dill, chopped
  • salt & pepper to taste

Preparation:

  1. Make Green Tea concentrate: Bring 8 oz water to a boil and let cool for 3 minutes, which will bring water to 175°, a good temperature to steep white tea. Place 2 heaping TBS of tea in an 8 oz measuring cup. Pour hot water over tea leaves and steep for 3 minutes. Strain tea leaves.*
  2. Preheat broiler for toast.
  3. Poach Eggs: Place green tea concentrate in small skillet, add the vinegar and bring to a low boil. (I just recently learned about adding vinegar to the poaching liquid from Cooking Light Magazine. As I experimented with this technique, I realized that they were correct; adding vinegar helped set the whites quicker.) Crack each egg separately and place each egg in a small bowl. Individually poach each egg by gently placing egg in green tea concentrate and cook until white is set and yolk remains soft and transparently yellow.  Rinse small bowl while egg cooks and fill with warm water. With a slotted spoon, spoon out egg, drain liquid and place egg back in small bowl with warm water. Repeat with remaining eggs.
  4. In a single layer, place bread on baking sheet, place in oven and broil for 2 minutes, until golden brown.
  5. Spread avocado mash on toasted bread. Layer smoked salmon, tomato, watercress, and poached egg. Garnish by sprinkling onion, capers, and dill and serve immediately.

How do you poach your eggs? If you have any techniques that might yield better poached eggs, please let me know...

 

2 comments:

Green Tea Fiend said...

sounds delicious! i just use a regular poaching pot where you throw eggs in the little cups and steam them. But even then, I find it hard to pull them off at the right time for the yolks to be perfect. never knew about the vinegar trick to that method of poaching. Will have to try that.

Tea Spot Chef said...

Actually, I place the eggs in a little bowl and gently pour the eggs into the skillet from the bowl. I don't like cracking the eggs directly into the skillet because the whites tend disperse everywhere. I've tried poaching the eggs in small bowls in the skillet of boiling water but it takes too long and as you mentioned it is hard to remove from the heat.